Brandon's Notepad

December 9, 2013

The Spiraldex

Filed under: Productivity,Self Improvement — Brandon @ 6:00 am
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Home > My Research > Improvement > The Spiraldex


Last year, I discovered The Scription Chronodex, a visual, non-linear method created by Patrick Ng for recording a day’s activities, either for planning purposes or as a record of what has already happened (or both). Here are my notes on its new cousin, the Spiraldex, by Kent from Oz.


Etymology

Like the Chronodex, the Spiraldex takes its suffix from the Latin word for forefinger, indicating that this method will involve pointing to something. The prefix “spiral” simply refers to the shape of the figure used.

Usage

Spiraldex in FilofaxThe Spiraldex figure has a lot in common with the Chronodex. Both mimic the orientation of the clock face, with twelve at the top and six at the bottom, both effectively begin the day at six o’clock in the morning and end at midnight, and both have the date affixed clearly in the center of the figure. However, whereas the Chronodex presents the first three hours of the day inscribed in the inner circle (the morning routine: breakfast, commute, etc.) and the last three are presented on a dashed line (time to wind down, watch television), all of the hours on the Spiraldex are marked incrementally around the curve of the spiral with tick marks dividing each hour into quarters. The general usage is the same: shade, color, or hash blocks of time within the spiral to represent appointents or events, and use callouts if space is limited.

Design Critique

Like its cousin, the Spiraldex is quite visually appealing. It looks especially pretty on the pages of a bound journal or day planner. Many of its fans state their preference over the Chronodex, claiming that the spiral design is much easier to understand and less jarring. I for one disagree. It was the awkwardness of the form that first drew me to the Chronodex. What’s more, the Spiraldex has what I consider a functional flaw. The hours of 9AM to Noon have no exposure to the exterior space to allow for note taking, but is completely obscured by the 9PM to Midnight segment; thus, lines to callouts must cross over the later hours. The dashed line on the Chronodex is there for a reason. So, not only does the Spiraldex not add anything new, it takes away a small bit of usability.

References


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