Brandon's Notepad

December 11, 2013

Getting Things Done: Shopping Lists

Home > My Research > Improvement > Getting Things Done > Shopping Lists


How do GTDers manage shopping lists? As I see it, there are at least two primary approaches: specific-item reminders and using lists as reminders.

The first is derived from the GTD text itself. Throughout his works and interviews, Allen consistently uses phrases like “buy cat food” as examples of mundane tasks that require some reminder; thus, each item on one’s shopping list would be a new record in the system. But when does this thought occur? When the current bag of cat food runs empty? The truly GTD-savvy would scribble this reminder on a slip of paper and bury it three-quarters of the way down each new bag of cat food they buy. (In business, we call this the “reorder level” or “reorder point”.) The reminder is added to the @Store context list, of course, so that the cat food will make its way into the basket like magic on the very next trip to the grocery store (or in the next online order delivered to your doorstep if your are so technologically inclined).

Canonical as it may seem, managing each new item as a reminder will inflate the ol’ GTD system fairly quickly. Maybe a more practical approach would be to slip a grocery inventory sheet into the Tickler File on the day prior to the next scheduled visit to the store. This will remind you to take stock of the pantry the night before. Once the inventory sheet is filled out, just slip it into the @Errands folder in your briefcase. Of course, this won’t help you when it comes to your attention (outside of the inventory activity) that something is needed, so you must either trust yourself to rediscover that item during the next inventory or deal with a potential hit to your confidence in the system by storing the reminder in some other way as well.

Alternatively, the inventory sheet is kept close-at-hand as reference material, a sort of planning tool for the project “Next Shopping Trip”. This way, a needed item can be checked or written in as soon as the need is recognized. Tablet/Smart Phone apps excel in this capacity. There is the concept of a perpetual inventory, of course, but even my most obsessive-compulsive friends haven’t gone so far as to install a kitchen inventory computer system complete with bar code scanners. A well-positioned “running list” is a simple and cost-effective solution.

Wish lists are a similar beast, though it may be a bit presumptuous to log each item on the “Waiting For” list.


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May 20, 2013

Android Applications: Shopping Lists

Home > My Lists > Android Applications > Shopping Lists


I do a lot of the household’s grocery shopping and I’m always running little errands to the grocery, hardware, and big-box department stores. My lists are manifest on paper, in e-mail, and (all too often) in my head. Sometimes I have to consult two or three different lists during a single visit. I needed to find a way to maintain a single, consolidated shopping list, and the tablet seemed like an excellent platform for the job.

[Content last updated on 5/20/2013]


Evaluation Criteria

The basic requirement is that the app reliably maintains a clean list of items that can be crossed off (or at least removed) as necessary. This is simple functionality and there are many Android apps out there that will do the job sufficiently. However, I really didn’t want to retype items that I buy on a regular basis, and it would be great to have a master list that I could use to take inventory around the house before a big shopping trip in the hope of cutting down the number of small errands in the week that follows. Identifying the store for each item is also important.

Here’s a few other considerations:

  • The ability to record an item’s price is of limited value to me for several reasons. First, prices change all the time (even if only by a few cents) and even if I know that one store has the lowest price, I’m not going to make a special trip if it’s the only item I need to buy there. Gas it too expensive these days to care much about a difference of a few cents on a can of green beans. Also, I’m not going to maintain price data for everything I buy across three or four grocery stores. It is nice to know approximately how much something costs and it is helpful to know the sale prices for the current week.
  • Many apps include barcode-scanning functionality, usually for easy lookup of items against a product database. It may be a neat feature, but I’m not going to make it a requirement. In part, I often prefer to be generic. For example, the line item “Shampoo for him” leaves room for choice based on price, availability, and the plain freedom to choose something different once in a while. [Based on my experience after the evaluation was over, this feature worked best with name-brand items and not so well with store-brand items — which happens to include a lot of what we buy!]

Selected App Reviews

OI Shopping List. [v1.6] This app is very simple at first blush but several advanced features make it scale nicely. Multiple shopping lists can be stored. Adding items to a list involves typing the name of the item into a text box at the bottom of the screen and clicking the ‘Add’ button. To check an item off of the list (or cross it off, depending on the theme) just tap it. The app can be configured to hide checked items automatically. The “Clean Up List” function appears to wipe all checked items from the list, but it really only hides them. The “Pick Item” function then lets you add items back to the list as needed. By default, this occurs in a dialogue box; however, there is a setting that allows for the picking of items inline on the list. A “Mark All Items” function allows for quick cleanup so that items can be picked or added anew. Wait, there’s more! Various attributes can be (optionally) set for each item, such as quantity, units, price, tags, priority (numeric), and even notes (requires OI Notepad). If any of the items on the list have a price, then the total is tallied at the bottom. Quantity and unit values precede the name of the item on the list view if they contain values. There are no categories (e.g. Frozen Foods), but tags work well in this capacity (caveat: without autocomplete, the tags would have to be retyped every time). Prices can also the tracked by store. (BUG ALERT! In version 1.6, no matter which item you choose, the Stores dialog box gets stuck on the first item on the list if it is accessed through the Edit Item dialogue box. Long-tapping on the item and choosing “Stores…” works fine.) Here’s the best part! The list can be filtered by store and/or tag! This works even when picking items to add to the list, which means you can set the tag filter while taking inventory around the house and then set the store filter when shopping at a particular store. When the store filter is on, the price for that store is shown! (Unfiltered, it shows the lowest price.) How powerful is that! There is also a barcode scanning function (which requires the Barcode OI Plugin), but I have not tried it.

This app is clearly my favorite because it met my evaluation criteria. It lets me work the way I want to work. I can turn on the inline pick function and go from room to room determining what needs to be purchased (a binary decision). The store filter turns my master list into a store-specific list, and the tag filter limits my choices when taking inventory and allows me to focus aisle by aisle at the store.

Out of Milk. [v3.1.4] This app has one of the best user interfaces in my opinion. Version 1.6 has three functions available: Shopping List, Pantry List, and To-Do List (not reviewed). The Shopping and Pantry lists look very much the same, and multiple lists of each kind can be created; however, these lists are integrated only loosely. In a Shopping List, a line item can include values for quantity, unit, unit price, and category, as well as check boxes for “Tax-Free” and “Coupon”, and a long text field for notes. The list is grouped by category and footed by two price tallies: “Total” and “Remaining Total” (i.e. price total of unchecked items). Setting the tax rate will automatically add tax for all items not marked as “Tax-Free” and prices are adjusted for coupons, either in amount or percentage. (BUG ALERT! I entered an item with quantity of “2” and unit price of $10. On the list it stated in small print, “2 @ $20.00”. This is misleading. “2 @ $10.00 = $20.00 Total” or “Qty: 2 Total: $20.00” would be far less ambiguous.) In a Pantry List, an item still has a unit price, category (with the same values as on the Shopping List), and notes. The quantity and unit values are still available, but not by default. In their stead, a slider control labeled “Amount” ranges continuously from “None” to “Half” to “Full”. The values on the line item are then qualified in small print as “None left”, “Almost empty”, “About half left”, etc. The quantity and unit values take the place of the slider if the “Enter Number Instead” checkbox is checked. The other two checkboxes don’t exist in the Pantry List. Both include a price history (stack array) that is automatically updated when a price is changed. So, it is obvious that the Shopping List function is meant to be used to plan a very specific shopping trip (with the possible side benefit of making you think twice about impulse purchases lest they mess up your perfectly-planned list) and the second function lends itself to keeping a household inventory, either periodic or perpetual (with the downside being that you have to review your entire list as you march through every store and reset the quantities either when items go into the basket or after the purchase is complete). These functions are not mutually exclusive. Use the Pantry List to track items typically kept on hand (like paper towels, soap, etc.) and add non-staple items to the Shopping List (such as steak because it is on sale this week or a bottle of wine for Friday night). This app also has a built-in barcode scanner that found every item I scanned, including desk supplies.

I really like the split Shopping List and Pantry List concept; however, unlike OI, I have to remember what is on each. For example, are bananas on the Pantry List or the Shopping List? Probably the former. Ground beef? Probably the latter.

Grocery IQ. [v2.5.2] This app has a very nice interface and it was going to be my app of choice when I started, but it quickly fell out of favor. For starters, and this was probably a fluke, but the first time I tried to use the app at the grocery store, my list was gone! It reappeared the next day. The barcode scanner would not return any store brand products. In fact, only brand name products could be found in the database. Also, this app is for use with electronic coupons, and I don’t use a lot of coupons anymore, so I moved on to other apps.

To be fair, I just fired up the app before writing this, and was able to find Kroger brand goods. I may revisit it someday, perhaps just for getting the coupons during shopping trips.

Our Groceries. [v2.2.0] This app is very basic. It does support multiple shopping lists and has a large number of generic products in its database (e.g. “eggs” and “milk”).

ZipList. [v2.3] This is a sufficient app that allows multiple lists, and common item attributes, such as quantity, units, size, price, etc. The database includes both generic and name brand items, but I did not try out the barcode scanner. ZipList does have a helpful store feature that lets you search for and maintain a list of favorite stores and customize the aisle order for each. Items can then be categorized by aisle (most have logical defaults) and assigned to particular stores in the list. This automatically sorts store lists to streamline shopping trips and prevent needless walks back and forth across the store.

The weekly ZipList e-mail newsletter includes links to a lot of tasty recipes.

Retail Store Apps

The retail grocers are definitely competing in the mobile arena. I have loaded a few apps, including Kroger, Albertsons, Tom Thumb, Target, and Walmart. They all offer a competitive list of features, including weekly ads, shopping lists, online coupons, store locators, prescriptions, shopper’s club rewards, gift card services, and gift registries.

Again, these apps may be useful for taking advantage of deals and coupon in-store (i.e. pick up an item and scan the barcode to see if there is a coupon), but I’d rather not have to access a half-dozen apps to plan the week’s shopping. Moreover, these apps are going to change more frequently than the generic apps to stay competitive, so I don’t see much value in reviewing them in detail.


February 27, 2012

Android Applications

ShortURL: http://goo.gl/wUxLzx
Home > My Lists > Technology > Android Applications


This page started off as a list of apps I wanted to try, become a set of reviews, and now contains a mixture of elements that I consider part of my Android experience.


Android & Me

A few years ago, I bought a tablet computer. It was a bit of a luxury, but it proved to be very convenient for things like casual browsing at the coffee shop and checking off shopping list items at the grocery store. I was using it more like a PDA than a browsing platform or ebook reader. I had already started compiling a long list of apps that I wanted to try, and after I started using the tablet on a regular basis, I started posting short reviews for many of them. At some point, it became impossible for me to keep up with the new offerings and all of the updates, and my work on this topic stopped. I continued to use the unit for some time, and then I was given an iPhone by my employer. My need for the tablet dissipated, and now I plan to repurpose the unit as a desktop MP3 player. I am now more interested in documenting my experiences with the Android tablet, retaining whatever remains useful from the reviews.

Reviews

I’m slowly migrating the sections below into bite-sized posts.

Productivity

Editing & Notetaking.

AK Notepad. [468K] By the makers of Catch (below). This appears to be a very simple notepad, but does allow tagging and export.
Catch. [size varies]
Evernote. [6.9M] I have started using Evernote online and love it! The app is great too!
Inkpad Notepad. [445K] I created an account and used this notepad online. It’s clean and simple, but I was hoping to see the same options as are shown on the screenshots for the Android app, namely the ability to create checkbox-laden to-do lists. All I get is blank notebook paper.
OneNote. [7M] Well, first of all, it’s made by Microsoft, which almost automatically disqualifies if from my list; however, I was impressed with it a few years ago when tablet PCs (read: laptops with swivel screens) first came out. It’s limited to a certain number of notes before you have to pay a license fee, and it does not appear that notes can be exported. I think I have better options.

Planners.

DGT GTD + Toodledo. [1.3M + 233K] This app syncs with Toodledo (with extension), which I already use for GTD components. I need this, but I’m not holding my breath. It’s third-party and only in beta testing.
Pocket Informant. [2.4M] It syncs with Toodledo and I like the book layout interface! The User Guide is available in PDF format on the Market page. I need to read this before deciding. For $13, which is a lot for an Android app, I expect it to work well.

Religion

Laudate (Catholic One). [4.8M] This is one of the first apps I had to evaluate. Confession: I installed it on a tab in the store. It has a lot of good stuff! I wrote to the author who confirmed that the lectionary and divine office require an Internet connection, but smaller content, such as prayers, rosary, and stations do not. Interestingly, the NAB Bible relies on a connection, but the Douay Rheims does not — I wonder if this is due to copyright restrictions. I came to realize that I could download most, if not all, of the same content to an SD card in PDF or TXT format, and/or cache it with Read It Later (see above).

Photography

Skitch. [1.5M] I definitely want this app if for nothing but to annotate pictures to post on Facebook.
Measure & Sketch.
My Measures & Dimensions.

Utilities (was System/Toys)

Bump. [2.7M] Recommended by a friend, but it looks like it’s most useful for phones, and I’m not sure I’d use it for much of anything at all.
Graffiti. [free:4.1M pro:2M] Palm-style data input. From what I’ve read, it disables some browser zooming.
Sky Map. [2.2M] Great reviews, and it’s not critical for me, so I will probably use it. I can get back into astronomy again!
Swype. Similar to Graffiti (above). I don’t see it on the Market anymore.
Voxer. [3.2M] PTT/walkie talkie functionality. Probably not necessary on a tablet. Perhaps on a phone. Recommended by a friend.
Connectbot. [707K] Installed this at a store. All I could do was ‘cd’ and ‘ls’. No grep, sed, perl, etc. The good stuff (if it exists) probably requires rooting the tablet.
Juice Defender. [size varies] Comes in regular ($0), plus ($2), and ultimate ($5). Recommended by a friend. I will probably try it.
Lookout. [3.3M] Security and antivirus suite recommended by a friend.
App Organizer. Recommended by a friend to keep app icons organized and not cluttered.

Yet To Research

Milage Tracker. I’d like to capture the data once.
Mindmapping. I’ve used MindMeister in the past. I don’t use this type of tool often.
DOT Reader. I’ve used Graphviz in the past and can create the files with a text editor.
PicsArt – Photo Studio
Sketch Notes
FreeNote
Note Plus +
GMemory


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